Welcome, Visitor!
Today is Saturday, November 1, 2014

Savannah contractor charged with mail fraud in meth house cleanup scheme

Comment   Email   Print
Related Articles

Douglas Earl McCasland, 45, of Savannah, was indicted Monday on 10 counts of mail fraud, and three counts of making false statements regarding the proper remediation of houses where methamphetamines have been produced, announced U.S. Attorney Edward L. Stanton III.
The indictment alleges that McCasland was certified by the State of Tennessee as a Methamphetamine Remediation Contractor and operated a business known as Haz-Tech. Under state law, all harmful residues resulting from the manufacture of methamphetamine must be removed from a house before it can be re-inhabited, and a Certified Meth Lab (CML) Industrial Hygienist must test the home to determine if it is free of harmful residue.
McCasland was not a CML Industrial Hygienist but created or directed the creation of Certificates of Fitness for properties upon which his company had performed remediation work, even after being previously warned against doing so by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. These certificates were mailed to County Registrars of Deeds and law enforcement offices for the purpose of releasing these properties from quarantine.
The indictment lists at least nine properties in Shelby, Dyer, Hardin, Carroll, Humphreys, and Coffee counties in West and Middle Tennessee where McCasland is alleged to have improperly certified the homes as being safe for habitation.
If convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to a $250,000 for each count of mail fraud, and up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000 for each count of making false statements.
“It is well known that any building where methamphetamines have been manufactured is a dangerously toxic place unless and until it is properly cleaned and tested,” said Stanton. “As the indictment alleges, Mr. McCasland’s fraudulent actions, risked the health and safety of the individuals who moved into contaminated homes, all so that he could profit financially.”
This case is being investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Postal Inspection Service. Assistant United States Attorney Vic Ivy is representing the government.
The charges and allegations contained in the indictment are merely accusations, and the defendants are considered innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Tags: 
None
Share: 
Comment   Email   Print
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software